Molecular Biology
  • How to Make Insulin-Producing Cells From Gut Cells

    How to Make Insulin-Producing Cells From Gut Cells

    Destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas is at the heart of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. “We are looking for ways to make new beta cells for...

  • Nucleosome Solenoid Model of DNA Packing in Eukaryotes

    Nucleosome Solenoid Model of DNA Packing in Eukaryotes

    In eukaryotes, the DNA is extremely large. For example, each human cell consists of more than 2 meters long DNA with 3.2 billion base pairs [1][2][3]. How does the cell...

  • End Replication Problem in Eukaryotes

    End Replication Problem in Eukaryotes

    The End Replication Problem is a small gap of nucleotides that is left over in the telomere region (end of the strand) of the lagging strand of the DNA double...

  • Prion

    Prion

    A prion is an infectious agent that is composed of only proteins which are wrongly folded. It does not contain nucleic acids like DNA and RNA. Therefore, they are not...

  • Ribonucleic Acid (RNA)

    Ribonucleic Acid (RNA)

    RNA is a poly-ribonucleotide molecule containing the four nitrogen bases Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C) and Uracil (U). RNA plays a key role in the expression of genes (DNA)...

Cancer Biology
  • What Makes Tumor Cells Addicted To Sugar?

    What Makes Tumor Cells Addicted To Sugar?

    For almost a hundred years ago is known that cancer cells feel a special appetite for a type of sugar called glucose. The tumor uses this molecule is like the...

  • Nanoparticles Cause Cancer Cells To Self-destruct

    Nanoparticles Cause Cancer Cells To Self-destruct

    Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumor cells to ‘self-destruct’ sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in...

  • Can Vitamin A Turn Back The Clock On Breast Cancer?

    Can Vitamin A Turn Back The Clock On Breast Cancer?

    A derivative of vitamin A, known as retinoic acid, found abundantly in sweet potato and carrots, helps turn pre-cancer cells back to normal healthy breast cells, according to research published...

  • Natural Plant Compounds May Assist Chemotherapy

    Natural Plant Compounds May Assist Chemotherapy

    Researchers at Plant & Food Research have identified plant compounds present in carrots and parsley that may one day support more effective delivery of chemotherapy treatments. Scientists at Plant &...

  • What Keeps Tumor Cells In Place?

    What Keeps Tumor Cells In Place?

    Researchers at the University of Freiburg have found switches that colorectal cancer cells use to migrate away from the primary tumor site and to invade neighboring tissue. This migration is...

Genetics
  • Human ‘Hairless’ Gene Identified

    Human ‘Hairless’ Gene Identified

    It’s not a hair-brained idea: A new research report appearing in the April 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal explains why people with a rare balding condition called “atrichia with papular lesions”...

  • Hormones In Action: It’s All About The Right Partner

    Hormones In Action: It’s All About The Right Partner

    Thousands of regulatory regions on the genomic DNA determine which part of a cell’s genetic information is expressed and which is silent. Daria Shlyueva and Alexander Stark from the IMP...

  • How Developing Sperm Stick To The Right Path

    How Developing Sperm Stick To The Right Path

    The process of producing high-quality, fertile sperm requires many steps. A study in The Journal of Cell Biology shows how the transcription factor p73 promotes this process by regulating the adhesions between...

  • 180 Million Year Old Chromosomes Found Preserved In a Fossil

    180 Million Year Old Chromosomes Found Preserved In a Fossil

    Researchers from Lund University and the Swedish Museum of Natural History have made a unique discovery in a well-preserved fern that lived 180 million years ago. Both undestroyed cell nuclei...

  • Fear Of Math in Your Genes?

    Fear Of Math in Your Genes?

    A new study of math anxiety shows how some people may be at greater risk to fear math not only because of negative experiences, but also because of genetic risks...

Stem Cells
Ecology and Environment
Evolutionary Biology
  • Humans and Neandertals Interbred, New Method Confirms

    Humans and Neandertals Interbred, New Method Confirms

    Technical objections to the idea that Neandertals interbred with the ancestors of Eurasians have been overcome, thanks to a genome analysis method described in the April 2014 issue of the...

  • Scientists Solve The Riddle of Zebras’ Stripes

    Scientists Solve The Riddle of Zebras’ Stripes

    Why zebras have black and white stripes is a question that has intrigued scientists and spectators for centuries. A research team led by the University of California, Davis, has now...

  • Size Does Matter in Genome Evolution

    Size Does Matter in Genome Evolution

    In many primates, females mate with multiple partners, causing an often-intense competition amongst males to pass along their DNA to be king of the genome as well as the jungle....

  • Neanderthals Spoke in Languages Similar to Ours

    Neanderthals Spoke in Languages Similar to Ours

    We humans like to think of ourselves as unique for many reasons, not least of which being our ability to communicate with words. But ground-breaking research by an expert from...

  • The Origin Of Birds

    The Origin Of Birds

    Mark Puttick and colleagues investigated the rates of evolution of the two key characteristics that preceded flight: body size and forelimb length. In order to fly, hulking meat-eating dinosaurs had...

Health and Medicine
  • Scientists Grow Cartilage to Reconstruct Nose

    Scientists Grow Cartilage to Reconstruct Nose

    Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient’s nasal septum, multiplied and...

  • Living Organ Regenerated For the First Time

    Living Organ Regenerated For the First Time

    A team of scientists at the University of Edinburgh has succeeded in regenerating a living organ for the first time. The team rebuilt the thymus — an organ in the...

  • Morning Rays Keep Off Pounds

    Morning Rays Keep Off Pounds

    A surprising new strategy for managing your weight? Bright morning light. A new Northwestern Medicine® study reports the timing, intensity and duration of your light exposure during the day is...

  • Chocolates Could Help Prevent Diabetes

    Chocolates Could Help Prevent Diabetes

    Improved thinking. Decreased appetite. Lowered blood pressure. The potential health benefits of dark chocolate keep piling up, and scientists are now homing in on what ingredients in chocolate might help...

  • Is Laughter The Best Medicine?

    Is Laughter The Best Medicine?

    Researchers from the University of Southampton have shown that cartoons could be a beneficial way of educating patients and empowering them to cope better with their long term conditions. “Humour...

Neuroscience
  • Brain Activity May Mark Beginning of Memories

    Brain Activity May Mark Beginning of Memories

    By  tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at the Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory. Using lab...

  • How The Brain Pays Attention

    How The Brain Pays Attention

    Picking out a face in the crowd is a complicated task: Your brain has to retrieve the memory of the face you’re seeking, then hold it in place while scanning...

  • Key Cells In Touch Sensation Identified

    Key Cells In Touch Sensation Identified

    In a study published in the April 6 online edition of the journal Nature, a team of Columbia University Medical Center researchers led by Ellen Lumpkin, PhD, associate professor of somatosensory...

  • Scientists Pinpoint Neurons Where Select Memories Grow

    Scientists Pinpoint Neurons Where Select Memories Grow

    Memories are difficult to produce, often fragile, and dependent on any number of factors — including changes to various types of nerves. In the common fruit fly — a scientific...

  • Sensing Gravity With Acid

    Sensing Gravity With Acid

    While probing how organisms sense gravity and acceleration, scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and the University of Utah uncovered evidence that acid (proton concentration) plays a key role...